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at 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific on c-span -- >> next a funeral service for former new york city mayor ed koch. after that, the washington press club dinner. and bringing news coverage in afghanistan. on monday, new york city mayor michael bloomberg and former president clinton praised ed koch. he died on february 1, 2013 at the age of 88. he served three terms as new york city mayor from 1978-1989. this portion is 20 minutes. >> i come today with love and condolences of new yorkers who are grieving with you at this moment. ed must be loving all of this attention. [laughter] i was thrilled he picked my neighborhood for his funeral. president clinton and rudy giuliani and governor cuomo and governor schumer and city and state federal and international officials and dignitaries, friends and family, fellow new yorkers, everyone is here today . i' i have no doubt ed is beaming and watching us down here. before last year's state of the city speech, we ran a video that included a shot of ed denting at the entrance ramp and yelling to all the cars that approached,, welcome to my bridge. welco
. president clinton president clinton and rudy giuliani and governor cuomo and governor schumer and city and state federal and international officials and dignitaries, friends and family, fellow new yorkers, everyone is here today. i have no doubt ed is beaming and watching us down here. before last year's state of the city speech, we ran a video that included a shot of ed denting at -- standing at the entrance ramp and yelling to all the cars that approached,, welcome to my bridge. welcome to my bridge. [laughter] needless to say, he brought down the house. after the cameras stopped rolling, he stayed out there in the freezing cold shouting, welcome to my bridge. he loved it and we loved him. no mayor i think has ever embodied the spirit of new york city like he did. i do not think anyone will. brash and irreverent, full of humor, he was our city's it essential mayor. it was an attitude he displayed for the world every day. we have such respect for him. it was matched by his integrity, intelligence, and independence. i was lucky enough to get an endorsement from him for first term of ma
the rabbi talk about what i was doing, i said i was mayor of a city of newark. he said, i want to talk to you about the city of jerusalem. i thought we would talk about current events and foreign policy. he said, i want to talk to about the city of jerusalem in the year 66. he said, the year 66, titus and the romans laid siege to the city of jerusalem. the city of jerusalem would not relent. years and years passed by. finally, up one person told him that if you want to take the city, you need to wait and be patient. inside the city, there is a problem. that problem will grow into a cancer and that cancer will eat away the very core of that community. if you know your history, what happened around the year 70 is the divisions within the city of jerusalem amongst the zealots and others became so significant that it weakened the city from inside. the rabbi told me that the city of jerusalem was taken in the year 70 by titus. he looked at me for a long time and i looked at him. he said, what is the moral of the story? i said, make sure there are no zealots in newark. [laughter] he said no.
the equipment works and is accurate. -- -- and the car was not moving for 30 seconds. host: new york city is accused of rigging red lights in a class-action lawsuit. new york city is facing a class action lawsuit. the city accused of rigging lights to catch more drivers and right more tickets. -- write more tickets. isidor is a republican in washington, d.c. caller: in d.c. on new york avenue, as you entered the scene, they have the camera right there. if you are headed into maryland or coming into d.c., they have the gotcha camera. there are police on duty right after you run the red light camera to slow you down and give you a ticket even if you got the red-light ticket. what about the drug drivers? they're really not that concerned. it is a money machine. they're all over. host: do you think it makes use a for? caller: no. i'm not saying they could use speed bumps, and i don't think it makes us safer. if anything, i've seen it cause a lot of accidents, people slamming on breaks. host: story from the washington post. our question for you this morning is what you think of red-light camer
was new york city. they began the first of their two terms. setting an important precedent for all their successors in the white house. welcome to the brand-new series. for the next year, we will spend time on personal biographies of each of the women who served at -- who served in the role in the white house. our first installment, market -- martha washington. for the next 90 minutes, we will try to serve up the essential martha washington with two people who have come to know or well. presidential historian william smith and patricia brady, who has done a biography of martha washington. why does martha washington matter? >> she was the first. she was one of the best. those things always count. she was able to help george washington make it through the american revolution and then two awful terms as president. >> this concept for this theory was something you championed early, a guiding light into how c-span might do it. why it should studying first lady's matter in this society we are living in today. >> we do not know enough about them as individuals. we do not know as much abou
at the unemployed host: this was advanced by an act from the new york city council. what did it say? guest: the new york city council passed legislation to make it illegal to refuse to consider somebody for a job solely because they are unemployed. it does not mandate that employers must hire unemployed people. it does not even mandate that employers must interview unemployed people what it does say is that the status of being unemployed in and of itself is not a disqualifying job characteristic. it is not something that an employer could use to say she is not working so put her aside. it requires employers to consider all qualified applicants on a fair basis. host: if a person felt they were discriminated against, how could they prove it? guest: there is lots of concern about trial lawyers and lawsuits. people are going to need evidence. they will need to that job ad has line was that either explicitly or implicitly makes it clear that the unemployed are not welcome. they would need statements either from hiring professionals, people somewhere in the process, a lot of workers have called us over t
in the past. grow up. host: jim is in bay city, michigan. republican. good morning. caller: good morning. i want to talk about this gas prices at four dollars per gallon. we have a president that all he talks about is solar and wind mills and stuff like that. it is ridiculous. we have oil up to our ears hear in this country, and environmentalists are the only thing stopping refineries and anything that makes it all. i wish they would go back to their caves where they belong. host: from "wall street journal," "florida governor supports broader medicaid," saying he wants the state to expand medicaid under the federal health law, taking him the seventh gop governor to back expansion of medicaid, along with michigan governor rick snyder and ohio governor john kasich. mr. scott said that he supports a three-year expansion as long as the federal government agrees to keep its commitment to pay 100% of the cost during this time. he called a compassionate, commonsense step forward. president obama's original 2010 health law called for the us to pay 100% of the cost for three years." that is in "wall
" was started by 68 kids in oklahoma city. they had decided they had enough. they were not going to put up with this kind of thing happening anymore in their world without them doing everything they could to make it stop. i have met every single one of those 68 kids. do you know what they taught me? they come from all walks of life. there are red, yellow, black, and white. they all have one thing in common. they all treat each other with love and respect. do you know what that tells me? that tells me that this is a doable thing. it's doable. if those 68 kids from somebody different backgrounds can learn to love and respect each other, help each other out, humans can learn that. it is doable. we have to learn to respect ourselves, don't we? i am not going to stand up here and tell you you have to try to like everybody. not everybody is going to like you. all i'm trying to say is we all have the right just to be here. every single one of us has the right just to be who we are. laura and i, we have been to 605 schools in the past year and a half. we have gone as far as australia. we have talk
in the city in ohio and if i did not have a public pension i think that would have been working for the rest of my life. an earlier caller mentioned pensions being affected, but when this crisis happened, you had to have some faith in the economic system. when you look at what happened during the depression, we came out of it. i figured at that time that the country would eventually come out of it. where would we have been five years later? nowhere. i have a tendency to side with the republicans, but at the same time i still think that some of those protections were warranted for people. into the system you get so many people on fox news, knocking down public pensions. the average person in ohio makes about $26,000 per year. all of that talk about locking down those pensions is just bad, really bad, they should stop it. host: what is your pension look like? tell us about it. caller: it is not a bad tension. they did change this, it has changed. you are able to retire at 55, but they changed it to 57. you need 25 years in the system to do that. most people will go for 30 years in ohio. i am a
new york city. caller: good morning. what you just read in the article, it makes the case why religious institutions ought not to be tax-exempt and get all the tax breaks that they do. they are using their tax breaks to hire lawyers that are costing the taxpayers even more money to basically just have a normal secular society. this issue of birth control, the rest of the world is laughing at us that we are even controverting over it. it should not even be an issue on the table. again, the tax-exempt status for religious institutions, i do not know if there are organizations that are trying to repeal this tax-exempt status, but i never really heard of a program on c- span about it, but these organizations, these religious institutions -- it is the tax breaks they get. host: nick from fairview, tennessee. on the independent line. caller: this is a ploy. socialists like the kennedys and obama, they will vilify -- if they cannot get it right, kruschev said, we will take two steps forward, and one step backward. we no longer live under a constitutional republic. liberals claim that
then go sell those on the streets of new york city at a substantial profits. as a trafficker, i would not make that purchase myself. i would send in a straw buyer to make a purchase. that's a straw buyer is a person who does not ever criminal record. so you would think he's going to go in and purchase five weapons. he would not do that. if he purchased five, the dealer would have to file a multiple. sales multiple that is a tipoff to the atf that trafficking is going to take place. instead of purchasing five from one dealer or 50 from one dealer, he goes to one dealer and purchases one and then to another dealer for another, until he accumulates them. you would think why does the fbi and not cross check those purchases if they know multiple purchases are an indication of trafficking? they cannot cross check them because of teart. that said the records have to be destroyed within 24 hours. the government is prevented from cross checking, predicted from connecting the dots. if you are conducting an investigation, a criminal investigation, you want to connect the dots. the amendment proh
way tonight in new orleans. alex is joining us next from new york city. caller: my comment is -- i am not particularly a sports fan. it seems very repetitive back and forth. as far as the regulation -- my observation, not just about football but hockey and also even baseball -- people seem to like people getting hit and getting beat up. they even like people looking kind of distorted like when they take drugs. i would be in favor if there could be a lot to prevent head injuries or young people being persuaded to do drugs to get onto teams or whatever. it is my commentary to my fellow americans the sunday morning that, it is like gladiatorial combat. . "the hunter games." it is almost like a freak show you enjoy watching human suffering. that is my cheery comment. host: thank you for the call. on the twitter page, there is this. back in 2009, tiki barber testified on the issue of head injuries at the high school and professional lover -- level. [video clip] >> you hear the file but comes from people who think the nfl is not addressing this issue. at the end of the day, it is a player p
. in the city of milwaukee, they have involved 112 private schools in the program, nearly 5000 students. $6,500 per student. the total cost, i assume annual, 164 -- $154 million. >> it depends on how you look at it. milwaukee past its first voucher program in 1989. it served as a model for a lot of other state voucher programs across the country. it serves over 24,000 students. there was a study that came out a couple years ago by the state that found vouchers were performing at the same level as traditional public schools in milwaukee. a more recent study out of the university of arkansas showed positive results for students with vouchers. i believe the program has been shown to offer pretty strong results in terms of graduation rates, but the milwaukee voucher program has been held up as the model, and the opinions of it will break down exactly along the lines of a voucher programs all over. clearly, governor walker believes if parents are buying into this program and it is proving popular, it will prove popular in other school districts around wisconsin. we will see if the legislature is
street and wall street. but the divide between the city and the rest of the country is at least as bad, and it seems to get worse every year. host: from january of last -- of last year, the president in his state of the union address. some of the same themes it will continue this week. -- will continue this week. you're looking at a live at view of capitol hill. what is america's number one priority? there is this on twitter -- another issue that will be facing congress this month and next month, sequestration. it is on the front page of the l.a. times. the piece points out for richard simmons -- simons -- simon -- this morning, bill kristol has this editorial -- that is from the weekly standard. study joins us from south carolina. . -- debbie joins us from south carolina. caller: i was just listening to the illegal immigration debate going on right before this. we need to do something for illegal immigrants. the parents we send back, the kids we leave here. i cannot have a child in south carolina and say, i'm going to take her to another state. second of all, the other thing that conc
bureaucracy can afford to bear the brunt of these cuts, not our military, not communities like lake city or mayo or newberry or middleberg, florida. i'm working with my friend from georgia, congressman doug collins, on the new freshmen regulatory reform working group, to help show exactly where some of these cuts are and help businesses do what they do best, they grow the economy and they create jobs, bringing in more revenues to our government. we need and we will show the president and the american people that we can cut wasteful spending without hurting kids, our seniors and that we can make responsible cuts that do not put our national security at risk. and not add to the heavy tax burden of hardworking americans that they're already carrying. it was a shame that the president and the senate have avoided working with the house in real budgeting process. i look forward to working with all my colleagues on resupporting -- restoring faith to the american people and bringing order back to this process. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back the balance of my time. mr. westmoreland: i t
that wisconsin is a state and that there are cities inside of it. if i say i like wisconsin there are a whole bunch of interest that passed it off of that. he need to understand that hierarchy of objects. you also need to understand how they relate to each other. >> does this personalization become complementary to search, does that create a new paradigm? the most recent thing that any of the large internet companies have come out with is this social search that facebook has introduced. it is that a stepping stone? >> there is the social graph. what i am talking about, it will give way to the interest graph. you know this set of things i am interested in, you know the other set of things other people are interested in. they aren't just based on, did they go to the same school, do they work in the same place, they are based on, are they interested in the same things? we can create personalization technologies because you can see what people are doing and provide you with information. there's also a very powerful social component because we can show you interests you may have in common with peo
city tennessee, or public in line. caller: yes. i want to make a comment. i think obama and handle -- hagel percent ace two state solution. is that correct or not? guest: at some point, that is their ultimate goal, yes. caller: don't you think that would make the situation worse, they are trying to divide it? the bible says that god is against that. dividing the land of israel. guest: i think that is a whole separate show on what to do in that region. it is far too complex to get into at this point. senator hagel has been very clear that he supports the president's approach to the region. host: talk about when senators are getting prepared. do they get a briefing book? how is that done? guest: they get some of that from the administration. the committee takes a set -- slightly different approach. the committee staff will also look at that. it is not the committee's job to rubber stamp the nominees. they will take their own look and prepare their own materials for specific members that they asked but also generally for the committee. certainly in an instance like this, i think the r
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17

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